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October 1999

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Subject:
From:
"Art Vellutato, Jr." <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
The Pharmaceutical Microbiology Mail List <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Sun, 31 Oct 1999 05:43:59 -0500
Content-Type:
text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
text/plain (86 lines)
Hi Jeff,

I did a little work on this some years ago for our operations. The problems
I found were alerting the people in the clean room that there was a message
from the outside and in broadcasting messages to the outside.  Noise in the
clean room and the operation itself causes problems in hearing.  At the
same time certain messages should not be broadcast for all to hear.  This
is what I found:

1.  Intercoms broadcast a message inside which may not be heard.

2.  Messages not heard must be done again. Thus you have someone standing at
    a station saying things over and over again. You may want to deliver a
    message to the aseptic core, but it may not be a message you desire
    bystanders to hear. And trust me you cannot sensor the language.

    An Example 1 from the outside to inside (it happens): "Tell Sally to
    disinfect her hands, when she does.....".  In short, define its use.

    OR

    An Example 2 from inside to outside: "Bob Supervisor please contact EXT
    101 in sterile room 8, the machine is stuck and there is broken glass
    everywhere.  This is our second request"

3.  If the area is curtained, they'll never hear you and will eventually have
    to come out of the curtained area.

4.  Is the message that important to bring those out of the curtained area
    time and time again.  Will it also be abused.

I would suggest installing a bright light that blinks when there is a
message from a supervisor (not accessible to all).  At which time, they can
access a clean room phone placed in a non-evasive area.  Conversations
should be limited and/or between supervisors in the area itself and the
exterior. And of course, they should not be broadcasted to the general
public.  Phone to phone talking.

The phone should be a phone only.  No keys.  Pick it up and the light
flashes and a tone sounds (beep, beep) on both sides.  Thus you can then
seal most of the cracks with a silicon.  Disinfecting agents will
eventually destroy the phone.  Then replace it.

Hope this helps.

Art Vellutato, Jr.
Veltek Associates, Inc.
[log in to unmask]




At 09:53 AM 10/29/1999 -0400, you wrote:
>Members:
>
>Could anyone provide me with information regarding an intercom system
designed
>for a cleanroom?  We need something that can be cleaned with disinfectants
>without shorting out or tripping circuit breakers. Or is an ordinary
telephone
>acceptable for use in areas where personnel are required to wear sterile
>apparel?
>
>Thanks for any information,
>
>Jeff Werner , V-P, PMF
>
>
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