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November 1998

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Subject:
From:
MaryAnn Parker <[log in to unmask]>
Reply To:
The Pharmaceutical Microbiology Mail List <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Tue, 17 Nov 1998 08:11:08 -0600
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     I'm not familiar with the bulk manufacturing process, but high mold
     counts are often seasonal. For instance, molds thrive in cooler, moist
     environments (which is what we are experiencing now in Texas).
     Therefore, molds can be coming in on people - in their hair or on
     their clothes.  Also, in cooler weather people tend to wear heavier
     clothes such as sweaters that tend to shed more than tightly woven
     clothes, and their skin tends to be drier (which you probably wouldn't
     see higher mold counts due to flaking skin).

     If you find the cause, please share it with the listserv.  Good Luck.


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: [PMFLIST] Mold contamination in production facility
Author:  The Pharmaceutical Microbiology Mail List <[log in to unmask]> at
INTERNET-MAIL
Date:    11/17/98 11:30 AM


        Hi Every body,

        I am a Microbiologist working in  Pharmaceutical industry. We are
        manufacturing bulk drugs in our facility. In recent times we were
        observing frequent mold contamination from our environmental samples.
        The area is class 10000 and we are now trying to find out possible
        source of contamination. I would like to get some more suggestions
        from the group members to find out possible source.

        Thanks

        Selvam.

        Singapore.


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